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Spring Sections

Anthropology 170b Topics in Anthropology: Bones, Bodies, and Forensic Cases

The accidental discovery of an isolated human bone or entire human body occurs more frequently than most people think. How these discoveries are dealt with is often a decision that involves local law enforcement, medical officials, archaeologists, and physical anthropologists. This course examines several such cases, following them from initial discovery to final conclusion. What clues do bones and bodies reveal? What evidence was found on or near these individuals? How do we piece together a narrative? Who decides what happens next? Contrary to what we see on television and in the movies, these cases require patience and cultural awareness and do not always lead to a clear happy ending.

ANTH 170.51 MW 1:30pm-2:45 pm April Beisaw

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Earth Science 111b Science and Justice in the Anthropocene

(Same as Geography 111 and Science, Technology, and Society 111)

Geoscientists have proposed a new designation in the geologic time scale for our current time period, “the Anthropocene.” The designation reflects the fact that human beings are acting as geological agents, transforming the Earth on a global scale. In this first-year seminar course we explore the possibilities of reconfiguring the actions of humans in the Anthropocene so as to lead to justice in environmental arenas and ultimately to a flowering of a new era once called ‘the Ecozoic’ by cultural historian Thomas Berry.

ESCI 111.51 TR 12:00-1:15 pm Jill Schneiderman

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Education 162b Educational Opportunity in the U.S.

In this course, students identify, explore, and question prevailing assumptions about education in the United States. The objectives of the course are for students to develop both a deeper understanding of the system’s historical, structural, and philosophical features and to look at schools with a critical eye. We examine issues of power and control at various levels of the education system. Participants are encouraged to connect class readings and discussions to personal schooling experiences to gain new insights into their own educational foundations. Among the questions that are highlighted are: How should schools be organized and operated? What information and values should be emphasized? Whose interests do schools serve? The course is open to both students interested in becoming certified to teach and those who are not yet certain about their future plans but are interested in educational issues.

EDUC 162.51 TR 10:30-11:45 am Maria Hantzopoulos

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English 101b Queer Alphabets

A primer in gay and lesbian literature, both classic and contemporary. We will examine a range of texts, including recent coming out stories, nineteenth-century encoded texts, a silent movie from 1919 Germany, the sonnets of Shakespeare and the love poems of Adrienne Rich. Other authors may include James Baldwin, Willa Cather, Henry James, Alison Bechdel and Carol Anshaw.

ENGL 101.51 TR 10:30-11:45 am Paul Russell

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Geography 111b Science and Justice in the Anthropocene

(Same as Earth Science 111 and Science, Technology, and Society 111)

Geoscientists have proposed a new designation in the geologic time scale for our current time period, “the Anthropocene.” The designation reflects the fact that human beings are acting as geological agents, transforming the Earth on a global scale. In this first-year seminar course we explore the possibilities of reconfiguring the actions of humans in the Anthropocene so as to lead to justice in environmental arenas and ultimately to a flowering of a new era once called ‘the Ecozoic’ by cultural historian Thomas Berry.

GEOG 111.51 TR 12:00-1:15 pm Jill Schneiderman

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Russian Studies 173b Women in Russian Arts: The Power and The Glory

This course is a survey of the major literary achievements by women authors in Russia and the Soviet Union. Women writers have made tremendous contributions to the Russian literary canon and continue to shape the trajectory of Russian literature to this day. The readings for this course cover major literary genres, including prose, poetry, memoir and drama from the nineteenth century to the present. Lectures and discussions explore questions of gender, genre and the socio-historical evolution of the female subject within the Russian literary canon.

RUSS 173.51 MW 1:30-2:45 pm Farida Tcherkassova

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Science, Technology, and Society 111b Science and Justice in the Anthropocene

(Same as Earth Science 111 and Geography 111)

Geoscientists have proposed a new designation in the geologic time scale for our current time period, “the Anthropocene.” The designation reflects the fact that human beings are acting as geological agents, transforming the Earth on a global scale. In this first-year seminar course we explore the possibilities of reconfiguring the actions of humans in the Anthropocene so as to lead to justice in environmental arenas and ultimately to a flowering of a new era once called ‘the Ecozoic’ by cultural historian Thomas Berry.

STS 111.51 TR 12:00-1:15 pm Jill Schneiderman

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Women’s Studies 160b Bodies and Texts

This first-year writing seminar is an introduction to issues in feminism with a focus on the body and its representations from the nineteenth century to the present. Special attention is given to female bodies, or bodies perceived as female, in works of literature and film of the French-speaking world. The course is taught in English and all works are read in English.

WMST 160.51 TR 3:10-4:25 pm Kathleen Hart

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