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Anthropology 170b The Peopling of the Americas

Did people first come to the Americas from Asia or Europe?  By foot or by boat or by spaceship?  In this course we investigate when and by whom and by what route North and South America were populated. According to current scientific thought, the Americas are the land mass most recently populated by humans, while many Native American groups firmly believe they have always lived here; Caleb Atwater thought Mississippian sites were founded by one of the 10 Lost Tribes of Israel, others think sailors from across the Pacific brought civilization to the Americas. Such issues have been major foci of Americanist archaeological theory since archaeology began in this country, and we examine both the theories and what they say about the attitudes of the Americans who promulgated and promulgate them.

ANTH 170.51 TR 10:30-11:45 am Lucy Johnson
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Earth Science 111b Science and Justice in the Anthropocene

(Same as Geography 111 and Science, Technology, and Society 111)
Geoscientists have proposed a new designation in the geologic time scale for our current time period, “the Anthropocene.” The designation reflects the fact that human beings are acting as geological agents, transforming the Earth on a global scale. In this first-year seminar course we explore the possibilities of reconfiguring the actions of humans in the Anthropocene so as to lead to a flowering of a new Era once called ‘the Ecozoic’ by cultural historian Thomas Berry. 

ESCI 111.51 WF 12:00-1:15 pm Jill Schneiderman
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Education 162b Educational Opportunity in the U.S.

In this course, students identify, explore, and question prevailing assumptions about education in the United States. The objectives of the course are for students to develop both a deeper understanding of the system’s historical, structural, and philosophical features and to look at schools with a critical eye. We examine issues of power and control at various levels of the education system. Participants are encouraged to connect class readings and discussions to personal schooling experiences to gain new insights into their own educational foundations. Among the questions that are highlighted are: How should schools be organized and operated? What information and values should be emphasized? Whose interests do schools serve? The course is open to both students interested in becoming certified to teach and those who are not yet certain about their future plans but are interested in educational issues.

EDUC 162.51 TR 9:00-10:15 am Christopher Bjork
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English 101b Art of Reading & Writing

Postcolonial cultures are often divided into two types: indigenous and settler, according to the circumstances of colonization and subsequent history.  This course will examine one of the settler cultures, Australia, through the lens of its literature, as it has developed since the nation’s origins as a British penal colony.  The focus, however, will be mainly on modern and contemporary literature, which has developed with extraordinary vitality in recent decades.  In addition to exploring the dynamics of this new Australian literature, we will consider the impact of British and American influences, and the unique situation of Aboriginal culture in Australia.  In placing it in the broad context of globalized writing in the 21st century, we seek to understand Australia’s ongoing contribution to anglophone literature. Authors may include Peter Carey, Helen Garner, David Malouf, Gwen Harwood, Alice Pung, Les Murray, Alex Miller and others.

ENGL 101.51 TR 1:30-2:45 pm Paul Kane
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English 101b What’s Love Got to Do With It?

This course focuses on representations of love (filial, parental, sexual, etc.) from antiquity to the present.  Situating the selected works in their contemporary cultural and historical contexts, the course explores significant differences as well as possible continuities between past and present interpretations and representations of such basic concepts and institutions as gender, family, marriage, filial and marital duties, the private sphere, and sexuality.  Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet serves as a chronological center for these investigations, but we will also discuss passages from the Bible and selected texts (representing diverse dramatic, epic, and lyric genres) by Euripides, Aristophanes, Ovid, Petrarch, Boccaccio, Chaucer, Shakespeare, Shelley, Emily Brontë, and others.  In addition, we will look at various adaptations (musical, theatrical, fine arts) of Romeo and Juliet as well as film versions.

ENGL 101.52 MR 3:10-4:25 pm Zoltan Markus
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English 101b The Ends of Black Autobiography

Autobiographical writing has been and remains a preeminent mode of African American expression. It was one of the first intellectual gestures that the formerly enslaved made when they gained literacy. It has fed music practices like the blues and hip-hop. It also may have created the circumstances by which the US could elect its first black president. Over the last three centuries, blacks have used this mode to insinuate themselves into literary modernity and register the often unacknowledged dynamism of their emotional and intellectual lives. This course will explore the aesthetics of black autobiographical narrative—its codes, tropes, and investments—from its beginnings in the eighteenth century to its most present iterations. If black autobiographical writing involves not only telling a story about a black subject, but also proffering a certain version of black life to its reading audiences, it is important to ascertain the nature of the cultural work that these stories (seek to) accomplish. Among the artists featured in this class are Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, W.E.B. Dubois, Zora Neale Hurston, Richard Wright, James Baldwin, Gloria Naylor, Barack Obama, Jasmyn Ward, Chris Rock, Oprah Winfrey, and MK Asante.

ENGL 101.53 TR 1:30-2:45 pm Tyrone Simpson
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English 101b Discursive Rise of Southern Hip Hop

This course will look at the music and discursive culture behind the direct action of the Civil Rights movement in the deep south.  We will chart a map from Sorrow Songs, Blues, and Soul to the decidedly Post Civil Rights era Southern Hip Hop with a particular emphasis on the artistry and message of the group, Outkast. 

ENGL 101.54 MW 1:30-2:45 pm Kiese Laymon
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Geography 111b Science and Justice in the Anthropocene

(Same as Earth Science 111 and Science, Technology, and Society 111)
Geoscientists have proposed a new designation in the geologic time scale for our current time period, “the Anthropocene.” The designation reflects the fact that human beings are acting as geological agents, transforming the Earth on a global scale. In this first-year seminar course we explore the possibilities of reconfiguring the actions of humans in the Anthropocene so as to lead to a flowering of a new Era once called ‘the Ecozoic’ by cultural historian Thomas Berry.

GEOG 111.51 WF 12:00-1:15 pm Jill Schneiderman
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Greek and Roman Studies 188b Homer’s Iliad in Modern Adaptations

Homer’s Iliad, dating from over 2 millennia ago, continues to inspire poets, playwrights and novelists working today. In this class we study contemporary responses to the poem, all of them composed in English within the past five to ten years. The adaptations include poetry, drama and novelistic responses. Among the questions we consider are: Why does the poem, which offers an account of the last year of the mythological war between the Greeks and the Trojans, continue to capture our imagination? What is it about our current cultural moment that has drawn so many artists to the ancient poem? How can we consider the role that Homer’s poem plays in these modern works while also taking these modern receptions seriously on their own terms? After a close reading of the Iliad, among the modern adaptations we consider are Simon Armitage’s The Story of the Iliad (2015), Madeline Miller’s The Song of Achilles (2012), David Malouf’s Ransom (2011) and Alice Oswald’s Memorial (2013).

GRST 188.51 TR 12:00-1:15pm Rachel Friedman
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Italian 168b Food Culture and Italian Identity

How did spaghetti and meatballs become the symbol of Italian cuisine in the United States? Is it true that pasta was not invented in Italy? How did a cookbook contribute to the creation of national identity? Could abolishing pastasciutta make Italians more optimistic? Images of food and dinner tables pervade Italian art and literature, celebrating pleasures or projecting desires, passing on traditions or stirring revolutions. In this course we will examine how eating and cooking habits intersect with material and cultural changes in Italy at various times, ranging from the Middle Ages to the present. We will investigate how issues of personal, regional, and national identity are shaped and expressed by food habits. Fiction and nonfiction writings, recipes, documentary and fiction film, advertising, and television shows will provide the basis for discussion and writing assignments. The course is taught in English. All readings are in translation.

ITAL 168.51 TR 3:10-4:25 pm Simona Bondavalli
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Jewish Studies 180b Interrogating Religious Extremism

(Same as Religion 180)
Where is the center in religion? And what defines the fringes, borders, margins and extremes? The aim of this course is to investigate the concept and category of religious “extremism” and how it relates to the equally fraught idea of “mainstream religiosity”: to what extent does it draw on it and yet differ from it? What is the difference between “extreme” and “marginal”? After investigating these categories, we identify beliefs and social practices of contemporary Jewish, Christian and Muslim groups that depart from what we have identified as “mainstream” bodies of tradition in significant ways and seek to understand the complex theological and social agenda behind them. We also investigate how these groups portray themselves and construct their identity vis-à-vis the more centered groups by simultaneously laying claim on tradition and radically deviating from it.

JWST 180.51 MW 12:00-1:15 pm Agnes Veto
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Mathematics 131a Numbers, Shape, Chance, and Change

What is the stuff of mathematics? What do mathematicians do? Fundamental concepts from arithmetic, geometry, probability, and the calculus are explored, emphasizing the relations among these diverse areas, their internal logic, their beauty, and how they come together to form a unified discipline. As a counterpoint, we also discuss the “unreasonable effectiveness” of mathematics in describing a stunning range of phenomena from the natural and social worlds.

MATH 131.01 TR 9:000-10:15 am Jan Cameron
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Political Science 150b Comparative Politics: Analyzing Politics in the World

This course introduces how comparativists analyze politics within states in the world. Topics include state formation, democracy and dictatorship, political economy, social movements, revolution, ethnicity, and political culture. The course draws from both theoretical work and country and regional case studies that may include the US, Chile, China, India, Cuba, Great Britain, Iran, the Middle East, South Africa and East Asia. The course uses cases to analyze and compare basic concepts and patterns of the political process. Students should come away from the course with both an understanding of the diversity of the world’s political systems, as well as an appreciation of the questions and concepts that inform the work of political scientists.

POLI 150.53 MW 12:00-1:15 pm Samson Opondo
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Psychology 186b Moving, Contemplating and Transforming

Engaging in a variety of active practices, students will explore processes of personal and institutional transformation. We will share activities involving movement, awareness, imagination, contemplative practices, and reflection on experiences. Students will pursue a personal transformation project, such as learning a new skill or deepening an existing practice. We will also consider how these activities can contribute to group or institutional transformation.

PSYC 186.51 TR 9:00-10:15 am Carolyn Palmer
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Religion 180b Interrogating Religious Extremism

 (Same as Jewish Studies 180)

Where is the center in religion? And what defines the fringes, borders, margins and extremes? The aim of this course is to investigate the concept and category of religious “extremism” and how it relates to the equally fraught idea of “mainstream religiosity”: to what extent does it draw on it and yet differ from it? What is the difference between “extreme” and “marginal”? After investigating these categories, we identify beliefs and social practices of contemporary Jewish, Christian and Muslim groups that depart from what we have identified as “mainstream” bodies of tradition in significant ways and seek to understand the complex theological and social agenda behind them. We also investigate how these groups portray themselves and construct their identity vis-à-vis the more centered groups by simultaneously laying claim on tradition and radically deviating from it.

RELI 180.51 MW 12:00-1:15 pm Agnes Veto
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Sociology 151b Other Voices: Sociology from the Margins

Ideas about society that we value usually come from the European, the heterosexual, the male or the fully-abled. In this course we will examine sociological ideas from those who may be overlooked, excluded, othered, minimized or dismissed. This may include Ibn Khaldun, David Walker, Maria Stewart, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Mother Jones, Marcus Garvey, Jane Addams, Ida B. Wells, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Horace Cayton and Malcolm X.

SOCI 151.56 TR 10:30-11:45 am Diane Harriford
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Science, Technology, and Society 111b Science and Justice in the Anthropocene

(Same as Earth Science 111 and Geography 111)
Geoscientists have proposed a new designation in the geologic time scale for our current time period, “the Anthropocene.” The designation reflects the fact that human beings are acting as geological agents, transforming the Earth on a global scale. In this first-year seminar course we explore the possibilities of reconfiguring the actions of humans in the Anthropocene so as to lead to a flowering of a new Era once called ‘the Ecozoic’ by cultural historian Thomas Berry. 

STS 111.51 WF 12:00-1:15 pm Jill Schneiderman
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