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Spring Sections

Please note that this information is subject to change. You should consult the online schedule of classes on Ask Banner for up-to-date information.

English 101b What’s Love Got To Do With It?

This course focuses on representations of love (filial, parental, sexual, etc.) from antiquity to the present. Situating the selected works in their contemporary cultural and historical contexts, the course explores significant differences as well as possible continuities between past and present interpretations and representations of such basic concepts and institutions as gender, family, marriage, filial and marital duties, the private sphere, and sexuality. Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet serves as a chronological center for these investigations, but we will also discuss passages from the Bible and selected texts (representing diverse dramatic, epic, and lyric genres) by Euripides, Aristophanes, Ovid, Petrarch, Boccaccio, Chaucer, Shakespeare, Shelley, Emily Brontë, and others. In addition, we will look at various adaptations (musical, theatrical, fine arts) of Romeo and Juliet as well as film versions.

ENGL 101.51 TBA Zoltán Márkus

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Earth Science 111b Science and Justice in the Anthropocene

(Same as Geography 111b and Science, Technology, and Society 111b)

Geoscientists have proposed a new designation in the geologic time scale for our current time period, “the Anthropocene.” The designation reflects the fact that human beings are acting as geological agents, transforming the Earth on a global scale. In this first-year seminar course we explore the possibilities of reconfiguring the actions of humans in the Anthropocene so as to lead to a flowering of a new Era once called ‘the Ecozoic’ by cultural historian Thomas Berry.

ESCI 111.51 TBA Jill Schneiderman

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Geography 111b Science and Justice in the Anthropocene

(Same as Earth Science 111b and Science, Technology, and Society 111b)

Geoscientists have proposed a new designation in the geologic time scale for our current time period, “the Anthropocene.” The designation reflects the fact that human beings are acting as geological agents, transforming the Earth on a global scale. In this first-year seminar course we explore the possibilities of reconfiguring the actions of humans in the Anthropocene so as to lead to a flowering of a new Era once called ‘the Ecozoic’ by cultural historian Thomas Berry.

GEOG 111.51 TBA Jill Schneiderman

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Jewish Studies 101b Politics, Law, Story

The course examines the political dimensions of Jewish thought, approaching questions of power and powerlessness through the concept of authority. Drawing on classical Jewish understandings of law and story, this multidisciplinary study takes up a wide range of texts, from Biblical narratives and classical rabbinics, to the modern novel and contemporary critical theory.

JWST 101.51 TBA Andrew Bush

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Jewish Studies 180b Interrogating Religious Extremism

(Same as Religion 180b)

Where is the center in religion? And what defines the fringes, borders, margins and extremes? The aim of this course is to investigate the concept and category of religious “extremism” and how it relates to the equally fraught idea of “main-stream religiosity”: to what extent does it draw on it and yet differ from it? What is the difference between “extreme” and “marginal”? After investigating these categories, we identify beliefs and social practices of contemporary Jewish, Christian and Muslim groups that depart from what we have identified as “mainstream” bodies of tradition in significant ways and seek to understand the complex theological and social agenda behind them. We also investigate how these groups portray themselves and construct their identity vis-à-vis the more centered groups by simultaneously laying claim on tradition and radically deviating from it.

JWST 180.51 TBA Agnes Veto

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Music 188b Duke Ellington: Life and Music

The subject of the course is the great jazz composer and bandleader Duke Ellington (1899-1974). As a world-renowned black musician from Washington, D.C., Ellington elevated jazz composition and arranging to a fine art, and he brought class and style to the performances of his band. We read about Ellington, listen to his music, view films in which he and his band are featured, and discuss his life. The writing assignments are focused on both biographical and musical issues, in which we explore ways to talk about the life and work of this remarkable creative artist.

MUSI 188.51 TBA Michael Pisani

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Religion 180b Interrogating Religious Extremism

(Same as Jewish Studies 180b)

Where is the center in religion? And what defines the fringes, borders, margins and extremes? The aim of this course is to investigate the concept and category of religious “extremism” and how it relates to the equally fraught idea of “main-stream religiosity”: to what extent does it draw on it and yet differ from it? What is the difference between “extreme” and “marginal”? After investigating these categories, we identify beliefs and social practices of contemporary Jewish, Christian and Muslim groups that depart from what we have identified as “mainstream” bodies of tradition in significant ways and seek to understand the complex theological and social agenda behind them. We also investigate how these groups portray themselves and construct their identity vis-à-vis the more centered groups by simultaneously laying claim on tradition and radically deviating from it.

RELI 180.51 TBA Agnes Veto

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Science, Technology, and Society 111b Science and Justice in the Anthropocene

(Same as Earth Science 111b and Geography 111b)

Geoscientists have proposed a new designation in the geologic time scale for our current time period, “the Anthropocene.” The designation reflects the fact that human beings are acting as geological agents, transforming the Earth on a global scale. In this first-year seminar course we explore the possibilities of reconfiguring the actions of humans in the Anthropocene so as to lead to a flowering of a new Era once called ‘the Ecozoic’ by cultural historian Thomas Berry.

STS 111.51 TBA Jill Schneiderman

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